Number Sense Goals

IEP Goals for Counting

Count to 100 by ones and by tens CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.1 

  • Ask the student to count up from one. Note: This captures how well the student rote counts, but not whether they have one-to-one correspondence.
  • Ask the student to count objects.
  • Ask the student to count by tens.

Check out the PreK-2 Mathematics Present Levels and Assessments Resource page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Juilio can rote count to 30 and can consistently count up to twelve items. He is not yet counting by tens.

  • Kindergarten goal 1: __________  will count to 100 by ones on three of four opportunities as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.1
  • Kindergarten goal 2: __________  will count to 100 by tens on three of four opportunities as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.1

As the special education teacher, you have the option to add modifiers to the goal to make it more achievable or more meaningful for the student. There are multiple ways to modify an IEP goal:

  • Add supports for the student
    • Given manipulatives, __ will count to 100 by (ones/tens/ ones and tens) on three of four trials as measured by teacher records and observations.
    • Given a number chart, __ will count to 100 by (ones/tens/ ones and tens) on three of four trials as measured by teacher records and observations.
  • Adjust the accuracy or number of trials
    • Can miss two numbers on one trial: ___ will count to one hundred by (ones/tens) with no more than two missed or out of order numbers as measured by teacher records and observations.
    • Can miss five numbers on one trial: ___ will count to 100 by (ones/tens) with 95% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations.
    • Needs to do it four times, but only get it right three: ___ will count to 100 by (ones/tens) on three of four trials as measured by teacher records and observations.
    • Needs to do it three times, but only get it right twice: ___ will count to 100 by (ones/tens) on two of three trials as measured by teacher records and observations.
  • Adjust the difficulty
    • Harder: __ will count to 100 by ones and tens with 95% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations.
    • Easier: __ will count to 100 by ones on three of four trials as measured by teacher records and observations.
    • Note: The standard is numbers to 100. You might need to modify that number (e.g., count to 50), but that is a more significant modification that some districts dislike.

Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120 CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1

  • Ask the student to count up from one. Note: This captures how well the student rote counts, but not whether they have one-to-one correspondence.
  • Ask the student to count objects.
  • Pick three numbers such as 25, 70, and 100 and ask the student to count up from there.

Check out the PreK-2 Mathematics Present Levels and Assessments Resource page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Moira can count up from one to 20, after which she begins to count by tens and she can count by tens to 100. If the teacher starts the pattern of 20, 21…22, Moira can continue counting in the sequence until the next multiple of ten at which point she needs modeling again.

  • First grade goal: ____________ will count to 120, starting at any number less than 120 on three of four opportunities as measured by teacher observations and records  CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1

As the special education teacher, you have the option to add modifiers to the goal to make it more achievable or more meaningful for the student. There are multiple ways to modify an IEP goal:

  • Add supports for the student
    • Given manipulatives, __ will count to 120, starting at any number less than 120 on three of four opportunities as measured by teacher observations and records  CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1.
    • Given a number chart, ___ will count to 120, starting at any number less than 120 on three of four opportunities as measured by teacher observations and records  CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
  • Adjust the accuracy or number of trials
    • Can miss two numbers on each count: Given two different starting numbers (such as 50 and 90), ___ will count to 120, missing or confusing no more than two numbers per trial as measured by teacher observations and records  CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
    • Variable number can be missed, but most should be right: Given a random starting number, ___ will count to 120, with 95% accuracy measured by teacher observations and records  CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
    • Needs to do it four times, but only get it right three: ______ will count to 120, starting at any number less than 120 on three of four opportunities as measured by teacher observations and records  CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
    • Needs to do it three times, but only get it right twice: ___
    • ___ will count to 120, starting at any number less than 120 on two of three opportunities as measured by teacher observations and records  CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
  • Adjust the difficulty
    • Harder: Given three different starting numbers, ___ will count to 120, missing no more than two numbers per trial as measured by teacher observations and records  CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
    • Easier: Given a random starting number, ___ will count to 120, on three of four opportunities as measured by teacher observations and records  CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
    • Note: The standard is numbers to 120. You might need to modify that number (e.g., count to 50), but that is a more significant modification that some districts dislike.

Count within 1000; skip-count by 5s, 10s, and 100s CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2

  • Ask the student to count up from one. Note: Counting to a 1000 takes forever. Only ask the student to start counting at one if you have reason to think they might make mistakes before 100. If they are crushing it, you can stop them at any point and ask them instead to start counting at a larger, random number.
  • If they can count past one hundred, pick a few random numbers such as 75, 200, and 550 and ask the student to count up from there.
  • Ask the student to count by fives, tens, and one hundreds.
  • If they do well, pick a few random numbers and ask the student to count by fives, tens, or one hundreds from there.

Check out the PreK-2 Mathematics Present Levels and Assessments Resource page for more baseline and assessment ideas or the 2nd-5th Grade Mathematics Present Levels and Assessments Resource page.

Ta Dah can count by tens to one hundred and count by ones to 30, after which she begins to skip numbers or goes to the next multiple of ten. She can count on from numbers smaller than 100 to the next multiple of ten.

  • ___ will count within 1,000 as shown by her ability to count on for at least twenty numbers from any random number between 100 and 980 with no more than two skipped or confused numbers and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
  • ___ will skip count by 5s to 50, by 10s to 100, and by 100s to 1,000 with 90% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2

As the special education teacher, you have the option to add modifiers to the goal to make it more achievable or more meaningful for the student. There are multiple ways to modify an IEP goal:

  • Add supports for the student
    • Place value blocks
      • Given place value blocks,___ will count within 1,000 as shown by her ability to count on for at least twenty numbers from any random number between 100 and 980 with no more than two skipped or confused numbers and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
      • Given place value blocks,___ will skip count by 5s to 50, by 10s to 100, and by 100s to 1,000 with 95% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
    • Number chart
      • Given a number chart,___ will count within 1,000 as shown by her ability to count on for at least twenty numbers from any random number between 100 and 980 with no more than two skipped or confused numbers and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
      • Given a number chart,___ will skip count by 5s to 50, by 10s to 100, and by 100s to 1,000 with 95% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
  • Adjust the accuracy or number of trials
    • Can miss two numbers on one trial:
      • ___ will count within 1,000 as shown by her ability to count on for at least twenty numbers from any random number between 100 and 980 with no more than two skipped or confused numbers and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
      • Given a number chart,___ will skip count by 5s to 50, by 10s to 100, and by 100s to 1,000 with no more than two skipped or confused numbers and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
    • Can miss three or four numbers on one trial:
      • ___ will count within 1,000 as shown by her ability to count on for at least twenty numbers from any random number between 100 and 980 with 90% accuracy and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
      • Given a number chart,___ will skip count by 5s to 50, by 10s to 100, and by 100s to 1,000 with 90% accuracy and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
    • Needs to do it four times, but only get it right three: ___
      • ___ will count within 1,000 as shown by her ability to count on for at least twenty numbers from any random number between 100 and 980 on three of four trials and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
      • Given a number chart,___ will skip count by 5s to 50, by 10s to 100, and by 100s to 1,000 on three of four trials and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
  • Adjust the difficulty
    • Harder: ___ will skip count by 5s to 50, by 10s to 100, and by 100s to 1,000 with no more than two confused or skipped numbers as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
    • Easier:___ will count within 1,000 as shown by her ability to count on for at least twenty numbers from any random number between 100 and 980 on two of three trials and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.2
    • Note: The standard is numbers to 1000. You might need to modify that number (e.g., count to 500), but that is a more significant modification that some districts dislike.

IEP Goals for Reading & Writing Numbers

Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects) CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.3

  • Read a list of numbers between 0 and 20 to the student and ask them to write down those numbers. Note: Start with numbers to ten. Only go past that if the student is being successful.
  • Give them a pile of objects an ask them to count the objects and write down how many objects there are.

Check out the PreK-2 Mathematics Present Levels and Assessments Resource page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Mike can write the numbers 0, 1,  2, and 3 (reversed). He can inconsistently write the numbers 4, 5, and 6. 

  • __________ will  write numbers from 0 to 20 with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations. CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.3

As the special education teacher, you have the option to add modifiers to the goal to make it more achievable or more meaningful for the student. There are multiple ways to modify an IEP goal:

  • Add supports for the student
    • Given a number chart, __________ will  write numbers from 0 to 20 with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations. CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.3
  • Adjust the accuracy or number of trials
    • Can miss two numbers on one trial: __________ will  write numbers from 0 to 20 with 90% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations. CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.3
    • Can miss  four numbers on one trial: __________ will  write numbers from 0 to 20 with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations. CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.3
    • Needs to do it four times, but only get it right three: ____________ will  write numbers from 0 to 20 on three of four trials as measured by teacher records and observations. CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.3

Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral. CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1

  • Check how high the student can count. Then focus on assessing which of the numbers they can count they can also identify or write.
  • Ask the student to read mixed up numbers to 10. If successful, do numbers to 20. If successful, continue to 100 or 120.
  • Then ask students to write numbers in the range that they can read. 

Check out the PreK-2 Mathematics Present Levels and Assessments Resource page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Diego can count to fifty, identify numbers to 20 with 80% accuracy, and write numbers to 10 with 90% accuracy.

  • First grade goal: _______ will read and write numerals to 120   with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1

As the special education teacher, you have the option to add modifiers to the goal to make it more achievable or more meaningful for the student. There are multiple ways to modify an IEP goal:

  • Add supports for the student
    • Given a hundreds chart,  _______ will read and write numerals to 120  with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
  • Adjust the accuracy or number of trials
    • If you assess with 10 random numbers for reading and for writing, can miss one on each: _______ will read and write numerals to 120  with 90% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
    • If you assess with 10 random numbers for reading and for writing, can miss two on each: _______ will read and write numerals to 120 with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
    • Needs to do it four times, but only get it right three: _______ will read and write numerals to 120 on three of four trials as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
  • Difficulty
    • Harder: _______ will read and write numerals to 120  with 90% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
    • Easier: _______ will read numerals to 120 with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1
    • Note: You can make the goal either just reading or writing. The number is to 120. You can adjust this– but it is altering the nature of the goal and you might get pushback on that in your district.

Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.3

  • Know where to start: If your student is working at a closer to kindergarten level, start with seeing how high they can count and number reading and writing to 10, then, if successful, to 20, and so on.  Stop the assessments when the student stops being successful. 
  • Base ten numerals: Ask the student to read and write randomly selected numbers between 0 and 1,000. Begin with smaller numbers and move towards larger ones as the student is successful.
  • Number names: I don’t assess for this. Spelling is often a significant challenge for students and there are few ways to assess for this that would be fair to the student– and I get the number names from their reading of the number.
  • Expanded form: Only assess for this if the student is successfully reading and writing numbers to at least one hundred. To assess for this I would 1) ask students to build five numbers from place value blocks;  2) ask them to collapse a few expanded form notations into base ten numerals; 3) with explanation and guidance, ask them to write the expanded form of a number (no one remembers what this means so the student will need modeling to make it fair)

Check out the PreK-2 Mathematics Present Levels and Assessments Resource page for more baseline and assessment ideas or the 2nd-5th Grade Mathematics Present Levels and Assessments Resource page.

Priscilla can read numbers to 100 with 90% accuracy and write numbers to 100 with 70% accuracy. 

  • Second grade goal 1: _______ will read numbers to 1,000 with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.3
  • Second grade goal 2:  _______ will write numbers to 1,000 with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.3

As the special education teacher, you have the option to add modifiers to the goal to make it more achievable or more meaningful for the student. There are multiple ways to modify an IEP goal:

  • Add supports for the student
    • Given a hundreds chart,   _______ will (read/write/read and write) numbers to 1,000 with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.3
    • Given place value blocks,   _______ will (read/write/read and write) numbers to 1,000 with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.3
  • Adjust the accuracy or number of trials
    • If you assess with 20 random numbers, can miss two:  _______ will (read/write/read and write) numbers to 1,000 with 90% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A. 
    • If you assess with 20 random numbers, can miss four:  _______ will (read/write/read and write) numbers to 1,000 with 90% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.
    • Needs to do it four times, but only get it right three:  _______ will (read/write/read and write) numbers to 1,000 on three of four trials as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.
  • Difficulty
    • Harder:_______ will read and write numbers to 1,000 with 90% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.
    • Easier:  _______ will read numbers to 1,000 with 75% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.
    • Note: You can make the goal either just reading or writing. The number is to 1,000. You can adjust this– but it is altering the nature of the goal and you might get pushback on that in your district.

There is no Common Core standard for third grade on number identification/writing, counting, or number sense. There are some on fractions, but for third graders I would recommend focusing on alternate mathematical concepts for goals.

Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.A.2

  • Know where to start: If your student is working far below grade level start with seeing how high they can count and number reading and writing to 20 or 100, then, if successful, move to  larger numbers.  Stop the assessments when the student stops being successful. 
  • Base ten numerals: Ask the student to read and write randomly selected numbers between 0 and 1,000,000. Begin with smaller numbers and move towards larger ones as the student is successful.
  • Number names: I don’t assess for this. Spelling is often a significant challenge for students and there are few ways to assess for this that would be fair to the student– and I get the number names from their reading of the number.
  • Expanded form: Only assess for this if the student is successfully reading and writing numbers to at least one hundred. To assess for this I would 1) ask students to build five numbers from place value blocks;  2) ask them to collapse a few expanded form notations into base ten numerals; 3) with explanation and guidance, ask them to write the expanded form of a number (no one remembers what this means so the student will need modeling to make it fair)

Check out the 2nd-5th Grade Mathematics Present Levels and Assessments Resource page. for more baseline and assessment ideas.

LeighAnn can read numbers to 100 with 95% accuracy and numbers to 1,000 with 80% accuracy. She can write numbers to 1oo with 90% accuracy and to 1,000 with 70% accuracy.

  •  _______  will read and write numbers to _____  with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.A.2

As the special education teacher, you have the option to add modifiers to the goal to make it more achievable or more meaningful for the student. There are multiple ways to modify an IEP goal:

  • Add supports for the student
    • Given a hundreds chart, _______  will read and write numbers to ________  with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.A.2
    • Given place value blocks,  _______  will read and write numbers to ________  with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.A.2
  • Adjust the accuracy or number of trials
    • If you assess with 20 random numbers, can miss two: _______  will read and write numbers to ________  with 90% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.A.2
    • If you assess with 20 random numbers, can miss four: _______  will read and write numbers to ________  with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.A.2 CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.A.
    • Needs to do it four times, but only get it right three: _______  will read and write numbers to ________  on three of four trials as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.A.2
  • Difficulty
    • Harder:_______  will read and write numbers to 1,000,000 with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.A.2
    • Easier: ______  will read and write numbers to 1,000 with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.A.2
    • Note: You can make the goal either just reading or writing. With this standard you can also set your own target number! Make it a nice stretch for the student– but not out of reach.