Letters, Sounds, and Sight Words Goals

IEP Goals for Letters and Letter Sounds

Kindergarten has two standards related to letters or letter sounds that can be used for IEP goals:

  • Standard 1: Demonstrate basic knowledge of letter-sound correspondences by producing the primary or most frequent sound for each consonant CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3a
  • Standard 2:  Recognize and name all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.1d
  • Provide the student with mixed-up alphabets in both lower and upper cases. I typically ask students for letter names on both cases and then for sounds on whichever case they knew better.

Check out the PreK-2 Reading Present Levels and Assessments Resource page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Tanea knows 22 upper and lower case letters and 21 letter sounds. 

  • Consonant letter sounds goal: ______   will demonstrate basic knowledge of letter-sound correspondences by producing the primary or most frequent sound for each consonant with 90% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observationsCCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3a
  • Letter names goal: _______ will recognize and name all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet with 90% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.1d

You have two goals to choose from based on whether your student has a greater need in letter names or sounds. Letter sounds are foundational for decoding and so I often focus on them for goals, but really both letter sounds and names are important so either works! The main thing you can modify for this goal is the benchmark for success– all letter or some, one on trial or across multiple trials.

  • Letter sounds
    • ______   will demonstrate basic knowledge of letter-sound correspondences by producing the primary or most frequent sound for 20 of the 21 consonants as measured by teacher records and observationsCCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3a
    • ______   will demonstrate basic knowledge of letter-sound correspondences by producing the primary or most frequent sound for all of the consonants on three of four trials as measured by teacher records and observationsCCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3a
  • Letter names
    • ______ will recognize and name 48 of the 52 upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.1d
    • ______ will recognize and name all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet on three of four trials as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.1d

IEP Goals for Sight Words

Read common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do, does) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3c

  • The Common Core is agnostic on which sight words list you use. Some of the more common (and easily available online) lists are the Dolch and Seeing Stars.
  • Once you have chosen a sight words program, you can start assessing students. For the youngest students, you just want to know if they know any (and if so which!) sight words. For older students who are still emerging readers, it’s helpful to start with the first list and check for any missing sight words. If they are missing just one or two, it can be easy to integrate those into group and to focus any IEP goals on the more advanced lists.

Check out the PreK-2 Reading Present Levels and Assessments Resource page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Susan knows 12 letter sounds and the sight word “I.”

  • ______ will read 15 common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do, does) as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3c

The main modification here is to the number of sight words. Sight words assessments typically take a while and so you want to avoid “three of four trials” or similar language if at all possible! 

  • Increase or decrease the number of sight words
    • ______ will read 12 common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do, does) as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3c
    • Seeing Stars has 25 words in each set so 25 words is the first list: ______ will read 25 common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do, does) as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3c
    • Dolch has 40  on its PreK list so 40 is mastering that list– and the K list is 52 words:______ will read 40 common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do, does) as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3c

Recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.3g

  • The Common Core is agnostic on which sight words list you use. Some of the more common (and easily available online) lists are the Dolch and Seeing Stars.
  • Once you have chosen a sight words program, you can start assessing students. For the youngest students, you just want to know if they know any (and if so which!) sight words. For older students who are still emerging readers, it’s helpful to start with the first list and check for any missing sight words. If they are missing just one or two, it can be easy to integrate those into group and to focus any IEP goals on the more advanced lists.

Check out the PreK-2 Reading Present Levels and Assessments Resource page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Susan knows 12 letter sounds and the sight word “I.”

  • _______ will recognize and read irregularly spelled words as demonstrated by correctly reading 30 words from a sight words list such as the Dolch Pre-Primer list or the Seeing Stars list and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.3g

The main modification here is to the number of sight words. Sight words assessments typically take a while and so you want to avoid “three of four trials” or similar language if at all possible! 

  • Increase or decrease the number of sight words
    • _______ will recognize and read irregularly spelled words as demonstrated by correctly reading 20 words from a sight words list such as the Dolch Pre-Primer list or the Seeing Stars list and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.3g
    • Seeing Stars has 25 words in each set so 25 words is the first list: _______ will recognize and read irregularly spelled words as demonstrated by correctly reading 50 words from a sight words list such as the Dolch Pre-Primer list or the Seeing Stars list and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.3g
    • Dolch has 40  on its PreK list so 40 is mastering that list– and the K list is 52 words: _______ will recognize and read irregularly spelled words as demonstrated by correctly reading 92 words from a sight words list such as the Dolch Pre-Primer list or the Seeing Stars list and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.3g

 Recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.2.3f

  • The Common Core is agnostic on which sight words list you use. Some of the more common (and easily available online) lists are the Dolch and Seeing Stars.
  • Once you have chosen a sight words program, you can start assessing students. For the youngest students, you just want to know if they know any (and if so which!) sight words. For older students who are still emerging readers, it’s helpful to start with the first list and check for any missing sight words. If they are missing just one or two, it can be easy to integrate those into group and to focus any IEP goals on the more advanced lists.

Check out the 2nd-5th Grade Reading Present Levels and Assessments Resource page for more baseline and assessment ideas or the PreK-2 Reading Present Levels and Assessments Resource page,

Joe knows 16 of the 40 Dolch PrePrimer words and 5 of the 52 Dolch Primer words.

  • _______ will recognize and read first grade level irregularly spelled words as demonstrated by correctly reading 30 words from a sight words list such as the Dolch Grade 1 list and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.2.3f

The main modification here is to the number of sight words. Sight words assessments typically take a while and so you want to avoid “three of four trials” or similar language if at all possible! 

  • Increase or decrease the number of sight words
    • _______ will recognize and read grade level irregularly spelled words as demonstrated by correctly reading 30 words from a sight words list such as the Dolch Grade 2 list and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.2.3f
    • _______ will recognize and read Kinder and First grade level irregularly spelled words as demonstrated by correctly reading 60 words from sight words lists such as the Dolch Kinder and Grade 1 lists and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.2.3f
    •  

Read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.3.3d

  • The Common Core is agnostic on which sight words list you use. Some of the more common (and easily available online) lists are the Dolch and Seeing Stars.
  • Once you have chosen a sight words program, you can start assessing students. For the youngest students, you just want to know if they know any (and if so which!) sight words. For older students who are still emerging readers, it’s helpful to start with the first list and check for any missing sight words. If they are missing just one or two, it can be easy to integrate those into group and to focus any IEP goals on the more advanced lists.

Check out the 2nd-5th Grade Reading Present Levels and Assessments Resource page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Joe knows 31 of the 40 Dolch PrePrimer words and 28 of the 52 Dolch Primer words.

  • _____ will read first grade level irregularly spelled words as demonstrated by reading 40 words from a first grade sight words list such as the Dolch Grade 1 list  and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.3.3d

The main modification here is to the number of sight words and their level. While the standard is for grade level site words, I often find that third graders who need to work on site words need to master the lower lists first. Sight words assessments typically take a while and so you want to avoid “three of four trials” or similar language if at all possible! 

  • Increase or decrease the number of sight words
    • _____ will read second grade level irregularly spelled words as demonstrated by reading 40 words from a second grade sight words list such as the Dolch Grade 2 list  and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.3.3d
    • _____ will read first and second grade level irregularly spelled words as demonstrated by reading 70 words from first and second grade word lists such as the Dolch Grade 1 and 2 list and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.3.3d
    • _____ will read grade level irregularly spelled words as demonstrated by reading 40 words from a third grade sight words list such as the Dolch Grade 3 list  and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.3.3d
  • Sight words standards stop in third grade. For older students you can use an earlier standard or try to twist a standard into a sight words standard. However, while  sight words are incredibly easy to teach they are painful for both you and the student to assess. If you have a fifth grader who has had special education for years, take pity on them and focus your goals on general decoding. I promise they are REALLY tired of getting tested on the Dolch words and you can still work on sight words in the context of a broader reading goal.

IEP Goals for Phonemic Awareness

Recognize and produce rhyming words CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2a

  • This is a purely oral assessment for students. The standard is for rhyming, which you can assess by having them rhyme words or, if they need more support, by choosing which of two sets of words rhyme.

Check out the PreK-2 Reading Present Levels and Assessments Resource page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Sanchez can identify the beginning sound in a word with 80% accuracy, tell when two words rhyme with 60% accuracy, and identify the end sound in a word with 20% accuracy.

  •  __________ will identify which sets of two words rhyme with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2a

The standard has both the recognition and production of rhyming words and so, for more advanced students, you can modify the goal to focus on their rhyming and for less advanced students, you can modify to focus on the recognition of rhyming words. You can also modify the percentage accuracy they need to reach to achieve the goal.

  • Recognition of rhyming words
    •  _____ will identify which sets of two words rhyme with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2a
  • Production of rhyming words
    • Given a CVC word such as sat or ran and a model, _____ will provide two rhyming words on three of four trials as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2a
    •  

 Isolate and pronounce initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable words CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.2c

  • This is a purely oral assessment for students. One way to assess this is through Elkonin boxes, where a student breaks a word into sounds. Other ways include asking students what sound they hear at the beginning, the middle, and the end of a word.

Check out the PreK-2 Reading Present Levels and Assessments Resource page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Sanchez can identify the beginning sound in a word with 80% accuracy, tell when two words rhyme with 60% accuracy, and identify the end sound in a word with 20% accuracy.

  • _____ will isolate  initial and final sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable words as demonstrated by correctly identifying beginning and ending sounds in words with 80% accuracy and as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.2c

This standard focuses on the isolation of sounds in words. You can modify the goal by adjusting which sounds the student has to isolate and their percentage of accuracy.

  • Changing the sounds isolated
    • _____ will isolate initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable words with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.2c
    • _____ will isolate initial sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable words with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.2c
  • Adjusting the accuracy and measurement
    • _____ will isolate initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable words on three of four trials as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.2c