Spelling Goals

IEP Goals for Spelling Letter Sounds

Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.2d

  • Come up with a list of CVC words that capture a wide variety of letter sounds and see what a student does– do they get the first sound? The end? The middle? If they can do that, how do they do with blends or digraphs?
  • The goal of a spelling sounds assessment is to see how many letter sounds a student encodes. If a student spells cat as “k,” they were able to encode the initial consonant sound. If they spelled cat as “kt,”  they were able to capture the initial and final consonant sounds. So give the student CVC words to spell and score it for how many and what type of sounds are captured.

Check out the PreK-2 Writing Present Levels and Assessments Page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

When given a CVC word like “cat” to spell, Rodrigo captures the first consonant sound 40% of the time and the last consonant sound 20% of the time. He is not yet putting down letter for medial vowel  sounds.

  • Kindergarten goal 1: _______ will spell  simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships so that at least two sounds for every word is encoded (e.g. ct for cat) on three of four opportunities as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.2d
  • Kindergarten goal 2: Given a spelling test, ________ will spell simple  words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships so as to spell 80% of beginning consonant sounds, ending consonant sounds, and medial short vowel sounds phonetically as measured by teacher records and observations  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.2d

This standard focuses on the isolation of sounds in words. You can modify the goal by adjusting which sounds the student has to isolate and their percentage of accuracy.

  • Change the types of sounds encoded
    • Change the number of sounds encoded: _______ will spell  simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships so that at least three sounds for every word is encoded (e.g. ct for cat) on three of four opportunities as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.2d
    • Changed the types of sounds encoded: Given a spelling test, ________ will spell simple  words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships so as to spell 80% of beginning and ending consonant sounds, phonetically as measured by teacher records and observations  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.2
  • Adjust the accuracy or number of trials
    • Kindergarten goal 1: _______ will spell  simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships so that at least two sounds for every word is encoded (e.g. ct for cat) on 80% of opportunities as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.2d
    • Kindergarten goal 2: Given a spelling test, ________ will spell simple  words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships so as to spell 90% of beginning consonant sounds, ending consonant sounds, and medial short vowel sounds phonetically as measured by teacher records and observations  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.2d

 Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.1.2e

  • Come up with a list of CVC words that capture a wide variety of letter sounds and see what a student does– do they get the first sound? The end? The middle? If they can do that, how do they do with blends or digraphs?
  • The goal of a spelling sounds assessment is to see how many letter sounds a student encodes. If a student spells cat as “k,” they were able to encode the initial consonant sound. If they spelled cat as “kt,”  they were able to capture the initial and final consonant sounds. So give the student CVC words, words with blends, and words with digraphs to spell and score it for how many and what type of sounds are captured.

Check out the PreK-2 Writing Present Levels and Assessments Page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

When given a CVC word like “cat” to spell, Lee captures the first consonant sound 50% of the time, the last consonant sound 40% of the time, and medial vowel sounds 20% of the time.

  • 1st grade goal 1:  ______ will spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions so that at least two sounds for every word are recorded (e.g. fa for fan) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.1.2e
  • 1st grade goal 2: Given a spelling test, ________ will spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions so that 80% of short vowels, consonant blends, and digraphs are spelled phonetically as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.1.2e

This standard focuses on the isolation of sounds in words. You can modify the goal by adjusting which sounds the student has to isolate and their percentage of accuracy.

  • Change the types of sounds encoded
    • Change the number of sounds encoded:  ______ will spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions so that at least three sounds for every word are recorded (e.g. krm for cram) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.1.2e
    • Change the types of sounds encoded: Given a spelling test, ________ will spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions so that 80% of initial and final consonant sounds and medial short vowels are spelled phonetically as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.1.2e
  • Adjust the accuracy or number of trials
    •   ______ will spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions so that at least two sounds for every word are recorded (e.g. ct for cat) on three of four trials CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.1.2e
    • Given a spelling test, ________ will spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions so that 90% of short vowels, consonant blends, and digraphs are spelled phonetically as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.1.2e

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.2.2

  • The goal of a spelling sounds assessment is to see how many letter sounds a student encodes. If a student spells cat as “k,” they were able to encode the initial consonant sound. If they spelled cat as “kt,”  they were able to capture the initial and final consonant sounds. So give the student CVC words, words with blends, words with digraphs– and, if they are successful, words with long vowels, “r” controlled vowels and so on to spell. Score the assessment for how many and what type of sounds are captured.

Check out the 2nd-5th Grade Writing Present Levels and Assessment Resources page for more baseline and assessment ideas or the PreK-2 Writing Present Levels and Assessments Page.

Drake is proficient at spelling beginning and ending consonant sounds. He can spell medial, short vowels with almost 80%  accuracy, digraphs (sh, th, ch) and consonant blends (sl, nt) with 60% accuracy, and long vowels with 40% accuracy. 

  • ______ will demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English spelling by spelling consonant blends, digraphs, and common long vowel patterns phonetically on 80% of opportunities as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.2.2

The language of the standard around spelling is vague, giving you flexibility to adjust the types of words or sounds that a student can spell. I am a strong believer in spell check and similar tools and so my goal is not for a student to spell perfectly, but for them to spell close enough for a spell check to guess. Therefore, these goals focus on the sounds captured in words, not on perfect spelling.

  • Change the types of sounds encoded
    • ____ will demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English spelling by spelling medial short vowels, consonant blends, and digraphs phonetically on 80% of opportunities as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.2.2
    • ____ will demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English spelling by spelling medial short vowel and long vowel sounds phonetically on 80% of opportunities as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.2.2
  • Adjust the accuracy or number of trials
    • Given a spelling test,____ will demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English spelling by spelling consonant blends, digraphs, and common long vowel patterns with 80% or higher accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.2.2
    • In an untimed writing sample with time for editing, ___ will demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English spelling by spelling consonant blends, digraphs, and common long vowel patterns phonetically on 80% of opportunities as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.2.2

Use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, position-based spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts) in writing words CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.2f

  • The goal of a spelling sounds assessment is to see how many letter sounds a student encodes. If a student spells cat as “k,” they were able to encode the initial consonant sound. If they spelled cat as “kt,”  they were able to capture the initial and final consonant sounds. So give the student CVC words, words with blends, words with digraphs– and, if they are successful, words with long vowels, “r” controlled vowels and so on to spell. Score the assessment for how many and what type of sounds are captured.

Check out the 2nd-5th Grade Writing Present Levels and Assessment Resources page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Drake is proficient at spelling beginning and ending consonant sounds as well as consonant digraphs (sh, th, ch). He can spell medial, short vowels with almost 80%  accuracy, consonant blends (sl, nt) with 60% accuracy, and long vowels with 40% accuracy. Drake is not yet spelling “r” controlled vowels or vowel diphthongs.

  • _______ will use spelling patterns in writing words so that she spells 80% of words with long vowels and “r” controlled vowels correctly as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.2f

This standard gives you a lot of flexibility to write a strong spelling goal for students! Base the types of  sounds in your goal on your student’s assessments– the goal is a challenging but attainable goal. The standard also includes language on word parts, families, and so on. I typically focus on phonics with my students and so focus spelling goals on phonics patterns. That way I know that I will be working on the goal during intervention time.

  • Change the types of sounds encoded
    • _______ will use spelling patterns in writing words so that she spells 80% of words with long vowels, “r” controlled vowels, and vowel diphthongs correctly as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.2f
    • _______ will use spelling patterns in writing words so that she spells 80% of words with consonant blends, digraphs, and common long vowel patterns correctly as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.2f
  • Adjust the accuracy or how it is assessed
    • Given a spelling test, _______ will use spelling patterns in writing words so that she spells 80% of words with long vowels and “r” controlled vowels correctly as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.2f
    • In an untimed writing sample with time for editing, _______ will use spelling patterns in writing words so that she spells 80% of words with long vowels and “r” controlled vowels phonetically as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.2f

 Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.2d

  • The goal of a spelling sounds assessment is to see how many letter sounds a student encodes. If a student spells cat as “k,” they were able to encode the initial consonant sound. If they spelled cat as “kt,”  they were able to capture the initial and final consonant sounds. So give the student CVC words, words with blends, words with digraphs– and, if they are successful, words with long vowels, “r” controlled vowels and so on to spell. Score the assessment for how many and what type of sounds are captured.

Check out the 2nd-5th Grade Writing Present Levels and Assessment Resources page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Drake is proficient at spelling beginning and ending consonant sounds as well as consonant digraphs (sh, th, ch). He can spell medial, short vowels with almost 80%  accuracy, consonant blends (sl, nt) with 60% accuracy, and long vowels with 40% accuracy. Drake is not yet spelling “r” controlled vowels or vowel diphthongs.

  • _______ will spell words with blends, digraphs, and long vowels with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.2d

This standard gives you a lot of flexibility to write a strong spelling goal for students! Base the types of  sounds in your goal on your student’s assessments– the goal is a challenging but attainable goal. The standard also includes language on word parts, families, and so on. I typically focus on phonics with my students and so focus spelling goals on phonics patterns. That way I know that I will be working on the goal during intervention time.

Note that by fourth grade, I often move towards assistive technology based spelling goals– if the student is still missing blends and such it is time to start looking at how to bridge the gap so the student can get into grade level writing.

  • Change the types of sounds encoded
    • _______ will spell words with long vowels and “r” controlled vowels with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.2d
  • Adjust the accuracy or how it is assessed
    • Given a spelling test,_______ will spell words with blends, digraphs, and long vowels with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.2d
    • In an untimed writing sample with opportunities to edit, _______ will spell words with blends, digraphs, and long vowels phonetically on 80% of opportunities as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.2d

Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.2e

  • The goal of a spelling sounds assessment is to see how many letter sounds a student encodes. If a student spells cat as “k,” they were able to encode the initial consonant sound. If they spelled cat as “kt,”  they were able to capture the initial and final consonant sounds.
  • So give the student words with a wide variety of sound patterns from digraphs to “r” controlled vowels. Score the assessment for how many and what type of sounds are captured.

Check out the 2nd-5th Grade Present Levels and Assessment Resources page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Dillon is proficient at spelling all consonant patterns including beginning and ending consonant sounds,  digraphs (ch, th, sh), and blends (sl, nt). He is proficient at spelling short vowels and he can spell long vowel sounds with 70% accuracy.  Other vowel patterns are more challenging for him and he can spell “r” controlled vowels with 40% accuracy and vowel diphthongs (oy, ou) with 33% accuracy.

  • _______ will spell words with blends, digraphs, and long vowels with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.2e

This standard gives you a lot of flexibility to write a strong spelling goal for students! By fifth grade, if students are still struggling with basic spelling patterns, my spelling goals typically involve assistive technology (see below for examples), because I want them to be successful doing grade level writing and engaging in writing for meaning– I will still teach phonics, but I will make giving students tools a big focus. 

  • Change the types of sounds encoded
    •  _______ will spell words with common long vowel patterns and “r” controlled vowels with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.2e
  • Adjust the accuracy or how it is assessed
    • Given a spelling test,_______ will spell words with blends, digraphs, and long vowels with 80% accuracy as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.2e
    • In an untimed writing sample with opportunities to edit,  _______ will spell words with blends, digraphs, and long vowels phonetically on 80% of opportunities as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.2e

IEP Goals for Spelling with Assistive Technology and Tools

Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.2g

  • I start the assessment for this goal with a spelling sounds assessment to know what types of sounds the student can spell (and how much of a need spelling is!) and handwritten writing samples. Then I see what they can do typing, using spell check, using a spelling dictation program, and, often, with full speech-to-text. Do the programs help? If a student has grade level ideas and kinder spelling, they should have access to technology in their classroom to let those ideas out! My goal is for my students to be successful without me and technology is, for many students, a big piece of how that happens.
  • A few notes:
    • Many districts have assistive technology departments with experts who do evaluations. Many also require that if a student is using district provided assistive technology that they have an IEP goal that uses the tech– and this is one way to meet that requirement.
    • I do still teach phonics– I just also think a lot about how to get the student to succeed right now when I am not in the room.

Check out the 2nd-5th Grade Writing Present Levels and Assessment Resources page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Rodrigo is proficient at spelling beginning consonant sounds in words. He can spell ending consonant sounds with just over 50% accuracy and short, medial vowels with under 20% accuracy. On writing samples, Rodrigo will often omit sounds in words or record only a few sounds for words (e.g., ct for cat), making it challenging for him to read back his writing. When given a tool such as a spelling dictation program or predictive typing programs, he is able to increase the number of words spelled correctly per sentence. 

  • _________ will consult reference materials, including spelling dictation programs, text prediction programs, and spell checkers, as needed to check and correct spellings so that all but one or two words in each sentence of a writing sample are spelled correctly as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.2g

You can change how you will measure the goal– are you looking for words spelled more accurately? More words spelled accurately? More words spelled phonetically? Because the actual assistive technology programs often vary by school or district it is better to write the actual assistive technology program more vaguely– for example, a student might love Co-Writer, but you would still write, “a predictive typing program such as Co-Writer.” That allows the next case manager to shift the program if needed.

  • Change the type of support
    • _________ will consult reference materials, including spelling dictation programs and text prediction programs as needed to check and correct spellings so that all but one or two words in each sentence of a writing sample are spelled correctly as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.2g
  • Adjust the benchmark
    • _________ will consult reference materials, including spelling dictation programs, text prediction programs, and spell checkers, as needed to check and correct spellings so that 75% of words in a writing sample are spelled correctly as measured by teacher records and observations CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.2g

Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.2d

  • I start the assessment for this goal with a spelling sounds assessment to know what types of sounds the student can spell (and how much of a need spelling is!) and handwritten writing samples. Then I see what they can do typing, using spell check, using a spelling dictation program, and, often, with full speech-to-text. Do the programs help? If a student has grade level ideas and kinder spelling, they should have access to technology in their classroom to let those ideas out! My goal is for my students to be successful without me and technology is, for many students, a big piece of how that happens.
  • A few notes:
    • Many districts have assistive technology departments with experts who do evaluations. Many also require that if a student is using district provided assistive technology that they have an IEP goal that uses the tech– and this is one way to meet that requirement.
    • I do still teach phonics– I just also think a lot about how to get the student to succeed right now when I am not in the room.

Check out the 2nd-5th Grade Writing Present Levels and Assessment Resources page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Rodrigo is proficient at spelling beginning consonant sounds in words. He can spell ending consonant sounds with just over 50% accuracy and short, medial vowels with under 20% accuracy. On writing samples, Rodrigo will often omit sounds in words or record only a few sounds for words (e.g., ct for cat), making it challenging for him to read back his writing. When given a tool such as a spelling dictation program or predictive typing programs, he is able to increase the number of words spelled correctly per sentence. 

  • Using a text prediction program, spell check, or spelling dictation program, _________ will  spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed, so that 75% of the words in a writing sample are spelled correctly CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.2d

You can change how you will measure the goal– are you looking for words spelled more accurately? More words spelled accurately? More words spelled phonetically? Because the actual assistive technology programs often vary by school or district it is better to write the actual assistive technology program more vaguely– for example, a student might love Co-Writer, but you would still write, “a predictive typing program such as Co-Writer.” That allows the next case manager to shift the program if needed.

  • Change the type of support
    • Using a text prediction program or spelling dictation program, _________ will  spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed, so that 75% of the words in a writing sample are spelled correctly CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.2d
  • Adjust the benchmark
    • Using a text prediction program, spell check, or spelling dictation program, _________ will spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed, so that 80% of the words in a writing sample are spelled correctly CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.4.2d

Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.2e

  • I start the assessment for this goal with a spelling sounds assessment to know what types of sounds the student can spell (and how much of a need spelling is!) and handwritten writing samples. Then I see what they can do typing, using spell check, using a spelling dictation program, and, often, with full speech-to-text. Do the programs help? If a student has grade level ideas and kinder spelling, they should have access to technology in their classroom to let those ideas out! My goal is for my students to be successful without me and technology is, for many students, a big piece of how that happens.
  • A few notes:
    • Many districts have assistive technology departments with experts who do evaluations. Many also require that if a student is using district provided assistive technology that they have an IEP goal that uses the tech– and this is one way to meet that requirement.
    • I do still teach phonics– I just also think a lot about how to get the student to succeed right now when I am not in the room.

Check out the 2nd-5th Grade Writing Present Levels and Assessment Resources page for more baseline and assessment ideas.

Rodrigo is proficient at spelling beginning consonant sounds in words. He can spell ending consonant sounds with just over 50% accuracy and short, medial vowels with under 20% accuracy. On writing samples, Rodrigo will often omit sounds in words or record only a few sounds for words (e.g., ct for cat), making it challenging for him to read back his writing. When given a tool such as a spelling dictation program or predictive typing programs, he is able to increase the number of words spelled correctly per sentence. 

  • Using a text prediction program, spell check, or spelling dictation program, _________ will  spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed, so that 75% of the words in a writing sample are spelled correctly CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.2e

You can change how you will measure the goal– are you looking for words spelled more accurately? More words spelled accurately? More words spelled phonetically? Because the actual assistive technology programs often vary by school or district it is better to write the actual assistive technology program more vaguely– for example, a student might love Co-Writer, but you would still write, “a predictive typing program such as Co-Writer.” That allows the next case manager to shift the program if needed.

  • Change the type of support
    • Using a text prediction program or spelling dictation program, _________ will  spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed, so that 75% of the words in a writing sample are spelled correctly CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.2e
  • Adjust the benchmark
    • Using a text prediction program, spell check, or spelling dictation program, _________ will spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed, so that 80% of the words in a writing sample are spelled correctly CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.2e